‘The Hate U Give’ : A Darn Good Book Review for A Darn Good Book

“You can destroy wood and brick, but you can’t destroy a movement.”
Angie Thomas, The Hate U Give

 

I’ve heard so much about this book it’s unreal. Everywhere I turn on social media, I hear about how amazing this book is. I would have read it before now but it turns out I’m really stingy – even when it comes to books. So, I’m walking through the library one day and I pass the new arrivals section and I see this book and I almost scream. Out loud. Yes, I know I need help.

A week later, I’ve jumped onto the bandwagon.

Starr Carter is one of the best literary characters in Young Adult fiction. She’s 41tdlloETWL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_always keeping it real. She’s got an attitude like you wouldn’t believe and has the common affliction of the teenage identity crisis. (Relatable to me, anyway.) Many other characters that I’ve read of are super fake and overdramatic. Not this one, though. She’s pretty cool. Starr lives in the ghetto and one night she witnesses police brutality firsthand by as friend Khalil gets shot multiple times by a police officer. This horrible experience leads her to question herself, Khalil, and the others around her. It also leads to national controversy and tests her bravery as she learns to speak up for the people that she loves dearly.

In light of the craziness of 2016 and 2017, this book is amazing for bringing up one of the most troubling and controversial topics of the past year-and-a-half. I love the themes of this novel (yep, there’s multiple), and the message it gets across. It’s a fiction novel that’s educating in its own way. “The Hate U Give” is a novel that opens your eyes to the world’s problems that are still around us today. Obviously, I read this book from a white person’s perspective. I have to say that doing that made me somewhat understand what the Black Lives Matter movement was about, and why people of color are so angry. Unfortunately, I say somewhat because I know that just seeing it through a fiction novel is not exactly like seeing it firsthand.

Despite the seriousness of this novel, Thomas makes sure to bring some smiles and laughter into this novel, making it even more delightful to read. It’s very comical, and the ships in this novel are definitely real. I mean, come on, Starr’s parents? CUTE!!

I don’t think I could tell you guys how much I loved reading this book. It was beautifully written, hilarious, cute, and eye-opening. I don’t care who you are or where you come from, you must read this book. The hype for this book is definitely real and the time spent reading it is, too. You won’t regret it.

 

My rating: wpid-images.png

 

 

If some of you have read this book already and have some thoughts, leave a comment because I’d love to read them! In the meantime, happy reading!!

Another Overdue Book Review – Let’s Pretend This Never Happened by Jenny Lawson

“You should just accept who you are, flaws and all, because if you try to be someone you aren’t, then eventually some turkey is going to shit all over your well-crafted facade, so you might as well save yourself the effort and enjoy your zombie books.”
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Let’s start with this: Jenny Lawson. Is. Hilarious.

I laughed my butt off when I read this book. The Bloggess is a phenomenal writer. In this book she tells about the insane events she’s experienced and has a good laugh at all of them. From dead pet squirrels and accidental cow insemination to the not-so serial killer outside of her bathroom door, Lawson takes the reader on many adventures in order to learn one simple lesson: bad memories aren’t really that bad, they make us who we are in the end.

There’s absolutely nothing wrong with this book, either. Jenny Lawson is an awesome story-teller, making you laugh your beautiful little bum off at every page turn (awkward wording intentional). She truly is awesome. And pretty hilarious. And full of painful yet amusing experiences. I wish I had known about this book way long ago, because I absolutely love it. 

Throughout the novel, there are many times you’ll ask, “What the heck is wrong with her?!?!” and that’s the beauty of it, ladies and gentlemen. She truly knows how to make fun out of bad experiences.

Overall, this book really deserves five stars. It’s light-hearted, insightful, and absolutely hysterical. The stories she tells are mixed in with the small tragedies that she’s experienced, making it an all-out amazing read. If you’re looking for a book that is fun-to-read and hilarious, you should pick this one. *whisper* It’s awesome.

My rating: Five Freaking Beautiful Stars. Jenny Lawson, you deserve it. 

 

 

One Flew East, One Flew West, One Flew Over the Cukoo’s Nest – A Review

Well, that was an adventure.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest is a novel narrated by a man called Chief as he tells his story about the many battles between McMurphy and the Nurse Ratched in an asylum.

At first, I had mixed feelings about this book. The excessive details and imagery in the very beginning turned me off almost immediately. It was a tad redundant, and it made it a little difficult to get into, which was a problem since it held so much key information. The writing style was unique, as well and I found it hard to get around it. It didn’t help much that it moved kind of slow. Until halfway through, I was pretty lost. Once the plot took off, though, my feelings changed.
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Now to the good stuff:

First things first: Billy is a gift from heaven. I love his character so much. Read it. Just for him.

Second: This novel really brought to light a lot of heavy subjects that had to do with the mental asylums in the 60’s and 70’s. I have a high respect for that, as I’ve read other novels that didn’t really do the job.

Third: THESE. CHARACTERS. They are so well-written and well-introduced – it’s great. Kesey did a very well job in bringing them into the plot and introducing them to the reader. I also just have to say it’s great to read a book where the characters are complex and aren’t …well, good.

Fourth: It was just. So. Put together. I really enjoyed that. It was kind of a pain because I knew that almost every detail was key in the very beginning. Still, everything in this novel meant something and it was really nice how complex it was. I think that really added to the overall meaning of the novel.

I wish I could have had the relationship with this book that I feel like I should have. Overall I enjoyed, but there were just moments that I just kind of wanted to put it down. Those great elements of this novel is what pulled me through (and the fact that I read this for English).

Oh, wow, I still have mixed feelings about this book.
But, seriously, I have to give this book credit where it’s due. This is such a good novel and I still recommend it. Once it really kicks off, it’s worth your time. Kesey did a really good job in writing this and I really enjoyed most of it. It had a few hang-ups, which is why I rated it what I did. But the rest is good! So, read it.

My Rating: IMG_0176

An Over-Due Book Review

“Like, oh, hey, great, here’s the rest of my life and it’s all still laid out in front of me.”

I’ve sincerely abandoned you nerds for a while, and I am so sorry. For a while I’ve been struggling with some things and so so busy and it’s been hard to keep up with this blog or even reading. I’m back now, though, and I hope I can pick it back up again. 

A book I recently read was What you Need by Andrew Forbes, which was an absolutely delighful book.

UGH this book took me way too long to read considering the lengt25250335.jpgh. It was definitely worth it, though.
“What You Need” is a collection of short stories involving a variety of characters in a variety of situations. In includes 16 beautifully-written shorts that are just… well, pretty great.

Overall, I think these stories are definitely stories that affect how you see people. Each short in this book have unique characters from different places and backgrounds. That’s what makes this so special. The personalities and backgrounds of the characters created by Forbes made me very intrigued and interested in the stories. It makes it an enjoyable read.

The author’s writing style is really nice, too. It helps convey what Forbes is trying to in these writings very effective. His writings are filled with a bit of tragedy, but mixed in there is a nice amount of humor. The style is interesting – a good interesting.

What I love, though, is how he makes humanity seem so mundane and yet extraordinary, in such a way that isn’t too sappy or over-romanticized/dramatized. With the characters, plots, and writing style, the stories are so entrancing that it’s actually not annoying. That’s a really nice thing if you don’t like books that are super dramatic or romanticized.

Do I recommend this book? Heck yeah. This book is just such a pleasant read. It presents humanity in such a compelling way and shows how people can come from such a vast variety of background. Yet it also shows how imperfect humans are, and how that can be such a beautiful thing. If you like that sort of thing (like me!) then you need to read this book.

My Rating: wpid-images.png

Winter of the World by Ken Follett: Review

Winter of the World is the second book in the Century Trilogy. This trilogy follows a series of generations in five different families struggling to survive through the 20th century. The second book, Winter of the World, picks up during World War II as the Third Reich rises and chaos ensues.

It begins with Walter and Maud Von Ulrich and their two children, Eric and Carla, in Berlin. Eric, who aspires to be a doctor, becomes a part of the Third Reich contrary to his parents’ wishes. Carla, on the other hand, works her hardest to become a nurse and assists in the war. On the other side of the world, American brothers Chuck and Woody Dewar both work their hardest to aid America in the war. Then we have Lloyd Williams, an Engl12959233.jpgishman who is determined to fight both Communism and Fascism to the best of his abilities. Winter of the World also follows Daisy, who cares only about her popularity, and her cousin Volodya, who is a crucial member of an intelligence team in Russia.

Yes, this novel is a total chaotic mess, but it has a great theme of strength and perseverance. It shows that in order to survive, we as humans use our strength and persevere through turmoil. Through the craziness of World War II, we see these characters fight through to reach their dreams and fight for what they believe is right. With that, it conveys its theme very strongly, and delivers a strong message about how with strength we can always survive.

Personally, I thoroughly enjoyed this novel. It was a bit long, but was worth the time. I always enjoy Follett’s work, and this one was equally enjoyable as all the rest. I especially loved how the characters were developed and how the plot was laid out. Unfortunately, it wasn’t as fast-paced as what I’m used to, but it was still quite enjoyable.

 

My rating: IMG_0176

Faking Normal: A Review

 

I stayed up until 2:36Am to finish this book and I don’t regret it.

I use the phrase “painfully beautiful” a lot. I guess I’m pretty lucky when it comes to the books I read. Almost all of them are absolutely fantastic. But this one… oh my gosh.15726915

Alexi has a secret, and she will tell no one. However, when Bodee, a.k.a. the “Kool-Aid kid” moves into her house after the death of his mom, things change for the both of them.

My heart hurts for Alexi, but it’s also swelled with love for her as well. I feel like this novel has such a strong message and I’ll never be able to shake it away from me. It’s one of those “feel good” books, that leave you smiling and squealing at the end, but it shows rape in one of its many forms (although, there’s only one definition), raw. It’s not romanticized, it’s shown how it is. I love that about this novel.

I cried through a lot of this. I’ll probably cry after I write this. I smiled. I laughed. I’m giving this novel 5 stars because it deserves it. Truthfully, it’s one of the best books I’ve read yet, and I’m glad I picked it up. I actually heard about it in the book club at my school, and although they spoiled it for me, I tried so hard to forget it so I could read this. I’m so glad I did. Yet, I’m so upset that I had to wait.

Ugh. You nerds have to read this. I’m totally heartbroken yet happy. I don’t even know how to explain it. I’m not even going to try. Just read this, okay? You’re not going to be disappointed. It’s too perfect to pass up.

My rating: wpid-images.png

 

The only problem I may have had with this book is the fact that I’d love to know what happened to Alexi after the end. Still, this book is fantastic and I definitely recommend it. Just make sure you keep some tissues nearby.

If you nerds have read this book, leave a comment below and let me know your thoughts about it. I’m really curious about what people thought.

Bye nerds! Happy reading!! ♥

Above by Isla Morley: A Review

UGH THERE IS SO MUCH TO SAY ABOUT THIS BOOK WITHOUT GIVING SPOILERS SO BARE WITH ME, K?

 

Okay, so this book was crazy. Really crazy. So, apparently a sixteen-year-old girl named Blythe Hallowell is kidnapped by a survivalist and is hidden in an abandoned missile silo. Seventeen years later, she escapes, and has to learn to survive Above.

 

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At first, I really enjoyed this book. It was action-packed and had a great writing style. The first part was just really great and I enjoyed it immensely.

Then she reaches Above and things went downhill from there.

Granted, I enjoyed this book, to a point. It was fun and interesting and it was very action-packed… In the beginning. As soon as Blythe reaches Above, it just wasn’t fun anymore. In fact, it was a total let-down.

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The idea of this book was there, but the execution fell flat. Personally, I feel like this book could have been cut in half. That so the first part wasn’t so underdeveloped and the reader had more time to get adjusted. I think that there was way too much that happened in this book.
Towards the end, it was hard for me to keep up with it because I had to remember minor details that was at the beginning of the book. In my opinion, this was because of the amount of events that occurred between the beginning and the end. There was just way too much.

Nerds, this book had so much potential! It’s so frustrating how this book is. I wanted to love this book so bad, but I just couldn’t.

My rating:

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I debated rating this a four, but there’s so much that kept me from doing so. This book was just such a let-down and I wanted this book to be so much better. Honestly, I wouldn’t recommend this book. If it had reached its full potential, then yes, I would. Still, this book still had more to work on.

 


 

 

Announcement: 

Okay, so before I go, I decided to let you nerds know that I’m changing the URL of the site on December 4th. I’ve found that the current URL is actually quite difficult for people (even me) to remember. I haven’t quite decided to what yet, I have a few contenders but I though maybe I could get a few suggestions from you lovely nerds. Thanks, guys!

 

Happy reading!! xoxo

 

 

Everything, Everything

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In this novel, Madeline Whittier is allergic to everything. So allergic, she never leaves her house. After  she gets a glimpse of a moving truck outside her window, and a boy named Olly, her life drastically changes.

Everything, Everything is just plain beautiful. The writing style is beautiful. Madeline Whittier is beautiful. Olly is beautiful. The plot is beautiful. I think you get the idea.

While this book was highly predictable (though I’m not so sure actually considering the fact that a friend kind of spoiled it by giving me a hint about the ending), it was an exceptional read. I loved every bit of it. This book actually reminds me a little of The Fault In Our Stars except for the fact that it’s not about cancer and they don’t travel to Holland. Still, it’s fantastic.

The romance for me actually wasn’t that excessive and actually added to the beauty of the book. Nicola didn’t seem to romanticize anything and made the story seem realistic, which is really important to me because I don’t like romanticizing illnesses in any sort of media.

With that being said, I’m in love with this book and most likely you nerds will be, too. It’s a wonderful read and hopefully you guys will read it and agree.

My rating:

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If you’ve already read this, feel free to leave some thoughts in the comments. I’d love to read them.

Happy reading!! xoxo

The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah

This novel is set in France during World War II. It begins in Carriveau, where Vianne’s husband is sent to war. At the same time, her sister, Isabelle, is sent to Carriveau to live with Vianne to avoid trouble. Although, trouble is exactly what both Vianne and Isabelle find. 

I honestly had mixed feelings about this novel in the beginning. I enjoyed it, but at the same time, something was lacking. I wasn’t as connected to the characters, and I definitely wasn’t sucked into the story as I would have liked to be. At first, it was kind of a letdown. 

However, as the story went along, all the pieces of the puzzle came together. 

 

 This book is fabulous, and although I didn’t get exactly what I felt like I should, it was still a delight to read. It’s a tear-jerking story of the strength of women and perseverance. It shows how people hold on to other people to get through life. 

I kind of regret telling my English teacher that I didn’t enjoy reading it. (Yes, I said that. Sorry!!) To be honest, the whole novel made perfect sense one I reached the end. (And yes, I cried.) I also thoroughly enjoyed that it wasn’t too heavy on the romance. I mean, I love romance, but I need a break every once in a while.

Would I recommend this book? Absolutely. It’s definitely a story that needs to be shared. Although it was a tiny but slow, it’s so worth it!

My rating:  

 

If you nerds have already read this book or want to, let me know what you think of it in the comments

Happy reading!! xoxo

Book Review: “Paper Towns”

Being a binge reader sucks. It’s like, going two months before finally picking up a book, finishing it, and then in the next three days you read like four books.

One of those books, happens to be Paper Towns. 

You guys know by now that I’m not one for following book trends, but this one seemed to be impossible to pass up. EVERYONE was reading it. So, I decided to give it a try.

51hgkNew+XL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Let me just put it plainly:

I loved this book. It was magical. There were so many things in this book that allowed me to look at life differently and made me realize so many things. I laughed, I got angry, and yes, nerds, I cried.

Paper Towns starts as Margo Roth Spiegelman climbs through her neighbor’s, Quentin’s, window and takes him on the night of his life. The next day, Margo goes missing. This sends Quentin on a quest, to find Margo, and to find himself.

I feel like this book says a lot of things. It says that people are ordinary. It says that people are complex. It says that we, as people, like to think of others as how we like to think of them, instead of how they really are. It says everything that a book, in my opinion, needs to say.

My Rating:

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Seriously, nerds, read this book. It’s fantastic and needs to be read. When you finally put it down, it’ll leave you looking at the people around you differently. If you’ve already read this book, go ahead and comment what you thought about it. I’d love to hear it.

HAPPY READING!! XOXO