‘The Hate U Give’ : A Darn Good Book Review for A Darn Good Book

“You can destroy wood and brick, but you can’t destroy a movement.”
Angie Thomas, The Hate U Give

 

I’ve heard so much about this book it’s unreal. Everywhere I turn on social media, I hear about how amazing this book is. I would have read it before now but it turns out I’m really stingy – even when it comes to books. So, I’m walking through the library one day and I pass the new arrivals section and I see this book and I almost scream. Out loud. Yes, I know I need help.

A week later, I’ve jumped onto the bandwagon.

Starr Carter is one of the best literary characters in Young Adult fiction. She’s 41tdlloETWL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_always keeping it real. She’s got an attitude like you wouldn’t believe and has the common affliction of the teenage identity crisis. (Relatable to me, anyway.) Many other characters that I’ve read of are super fake and overdramatic. Not this one, though. She’s pretty cool. Starr lives in the ghetto and one night she witnesses police brutality firsthand by as friend Khalil gets shot multiple times by a police officer. This horrible experience leads her to question herself, Khalil, and the others around her. It also leads to national controversy and tests her bravery as she learns to speak up for the people that she loves dearly.

In light of the craziness of 2016 and 2017, this book is amazing for bringing up one of the most troubling and controversial topics of the past year-and-a-half. I love the themes of this novel (yep, there’s multiple), and the message it gets across. It’s a fiction novel that’s educating in its own way. “The Hate U Give” is a novel that opens your eyes to the world’s problems that are still around us today. Obviously, I read this book from a white person’s perspective. I have to say that doing that made me somewhat understand what the Black Lives Matter movement was about, and why people of color are so angry. Unfortunately, I say somewhat because I know that just seeing it through a fiction novel is not exactly like seeing it firsthand.

Despite the seriousness of this novel, Thomas makes sure to bring some smiles and laughter into this novel, making it even more delightful to read. It’s very comical, and the ships in this novel are definitely real. I mean, come on, Starr’s parents? CUTE!!

I don’t think I could tell you guys how much I loved reading this book. It was beautifully written, hilarious, cute, and eye-opening. I don’t care who you are or where you come from, you must read this book. The hype for this book is definitely real and the time spent reading it is, too. You won’t regret it.

 

My rating: wpid-images.png

 

 

If some of you have read this book already and have some thoughts, leave a comment because I’d love to read them! In the meantime, happy reading!!

Never Take Me To A Bookstore (Or Anywhere Around Books)

I know, I know. I kind of went back on my promise and went incognito (AGAIN). But I’m back (AGAIN).This time, I actually have a good excuse.

After my last post, a lot of things started going on. It started with some personal things that were going on, then slid to vacation. At first my mom and I planned on going to someplace like Gatlinburg, Tennessee or the beach. Well, plans changed and we ended up going to visit relatives in Michigan with my grandmother tagging along- oh, and don’t worry, it was still fun.The whole week we visited family member after family member. It was fun, don’t get me wrong. Still, AN INTROVERT HAS TO BREATHE. In order to do that, I went to my safe place:

Books.

Despite the fact that I already have two bookshelves full and several stacks of books in my closet, what else was I supposed to do but go book shopping?

Total count: 40

Of course, there were other things that I got and collected, but mostly what I got is obvious.

DSCN2562

Once I got home and spread the books out to go through my titles, I realized: I have a serious problem.

When I first began learning how to read mom and I would go to the library every month. We’d come home with only a few books that mom would read to me every night before bed. My book pile started small; two or three books here and there, nothing big. But then, it grew. I’d take home fifteen to even twenty books sometimes. It went on a year or two, until we weren’t reading the books fast enough and started missing the return dates. Then mom started taking me to bookstores. Of course, that was a mistake.

Another instance was in elementary school. We had these events called book fairs, and it was like a mini book store that students could go to and buy books. It lasted about one week out of the year and it would always include a family night at the end of the week for the families to come and walk around with their children and check it out themselves. Every year for five consecutive years would my mom and I attend this book fair. That’s when the problem got worse. I personally think it was mom’s fault, and let me explain to you why.

So, mom and I would be walking through the school library (where the book fair was held) and mom would browse through the books while I would wander off to find the books that I liked. No matter what genre it was, mom would come up to me on several occasions with books in her hands and let me read the backs of them. Here’s the problem: I hated reading synopses. Absolutely hated them. Hence, when mom would give me a book to read the synopsis of, I’d pretend to read it, then say: “Sounds great!” and place it in the bag.

We’d end up going home with about three bags of books and an empty wallet.

And on this would go. Even now, as I’m older and in high school, I just pick books off the shelf that look cool and put them in the basket. Occasionally nowadays I’ll read what it’s about, but, now that I’m obsessed with books, I still can’t stop buying. Like the other day when I came out of Salvation Army (or Salvo’s as my wonderful aunt calls it) with eleven books. Hey, but don’t blame me, when there’s a sale, you know you gotta have ’em!

In conclusion: never take me to a bookstore.You never know what I’ll find.

Happy Reading!! xoxoxo

Who I Am Today

When I was first exposed to the event that changed my life, I was incredibly young. I only vaguely remember the day when my mom brought home the first book I ever learned to read: “Dick and Jane.” I was only three years old. Go aheead, make fun of me, but I promise, that was the book that made me who I am today.

George R. R. Martin once said: “A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies… The man who never reads lives only one.” This is exactly how I feel. When I read, I travel. Whether it’s to Narnia to meet Aslan the Lion and the Pevencies or to England during the anarchy of the 12th century, I’m always traveling. Through books, I’ve gained friends, lost friends, traveled, saw, and lived. I’ve seen the Tribulation, the Holocaust, and the fall of Troy. I’ve met Hermione and Anne Frank. Without books, I would not be who I am today. Without the lives I’ve lived and the people that have befriended me and betreayed me, I wouldn’t have learned the lessons I need to survive in life.

I have always told my mom that I blamed her for how I am now. It is technically her fault. Ever since she brought home my first book and taught me how to read, I developed an addiction; an addiction  that not even the best rehab can fix. To be honest, though, I’m thankful. Without her, I wouldn’t have experienced all I have. Still, it’s to the books and their authors that I am most thankful. If the author who had written these books, if he hadn’t sat down and put their time and effort to putting their deepest thoughts on paper, my life would be so different now.

Ever since I was three years old, books and words have enveloped me in their warm embrace. I have always been intrigued by the words on a page that has the potential to lead a person into a whole different dimension. If it weren’t for the book I’ve read, the things I’ve seen, and the people I’ve met, I would be a totally different person. I’m proud of the fact that I have seen so much for a person of my age. I’m proud of the fact that I’m a reader. If I wasn’t, I would never be who I am today.