‘The Hate U Give’ : A Darn Good Book Review for A Darn Good Book

“You can destroy wood and brick, but you can’t destroy a movement.”
Angie Thomas, The Hate U Give

 

I’ve heard so much about this book it’s unreal. Everywhere I turn on social media, I hear about how amazing this book is. I would have read it before now but it turns out I’m really stingy – even when it comes to books. So, I’m walking through the library one day and I pass the new arrivals section and I see this book and I almost scream. Out loud. Yes, I know I need help.

A week later, I’ve jumped onto the bandwagon.

Starr Carter is one of the best literary characters in Young Adult fiction. She’s 41tdlloETWL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_always keeping it real. She’s got an attitude like you wouldn’t believe and has the common affliction of the teenage identity crisis. (Relatable to me, anyway.) Many other characters that I’ve read of are super fake and overdramatic. Not this one, though. She’s pretty cool. Starr lives in the ghetto and one night she witnesses police brutality firsthand by as friend Khalil gets shot multiple times by a police officer. This horrible experience leads her to question herself, Khalil, and the others around her. It also leads to national controversy and tests her bravery as she learns to speak up for the people that she loves dearly.

In light of the craziness of 2016 and 2017, this book is amazing for bringing up one of the most troubling and controversial topics of the past year-and-a-half. I love the themes of this novel (yep, there’s multiple), and the message it gets across. It’s a fiction novel that’s educating in its own way. “The Hate U Give” is a novel that opens your eyes to the world’s problems that are still around us today. Obviously, I read this book from a white person’s perspective. I have to say that doing that made me somewhat understand what the Black Lives Matter movement was about, and why people of color are so angry. Unfortunately, I say somewhat because I know that just seeing it through a fiction novel is not exactly like seeing it firsthand.

Despite the seriousness of this novel, Thomas makes sure to bring some smiles and laughter into this novel, making it even more delightful to read. It’s very comical, and the ships in this novel are definitely real. I mean, come on, Starr’s parents? CUTE!!

I don’t think I could tell you guys how much I loved reading this book. It was beautifully written, hilarious, cute, and eye-opening. I don’t care who you are or where you come from, you must read this book. The hype for this book is definitely real and the time spent reading it is, too. You won’t regret it.

 

My rating: wpid-images.png

 

 

If some of you have read this book already and have some thoughts, leave a comment because I’d love to read them! In the meantime, happy reading!!

Another Overdue Book Review – Let’s Pretend This Never Happened by Jenny Lawson

“You should just accept who you are, flaws and all, because if you try to be someone you aren’t, then eventually some turkey is going to shit all over your well-crafted facade, so you might as well save yourself the effort and enjoy your zombie books.”
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Let’s start with this: Jenny Lawson. Is. Hilarious.

I laughed my butt off when I read this book. The Bloggess is a phenomenal writer. In this book she tells about the insane events she’s experienced and has a good laugh at all of them. From dead pet squirrels and accidental cow insemination to the not-so serial killer outside of her bathroom door, Lawson takes the reader on many adventures in order to learn one simple lesson: bad memories aren’t really that bad, they make us who we are in the end.

There’s absolutely nothing wrong with this book, either. Jenny Lawson is an awesome story-teller, making you laugh your beautiful little bum off at every page turn (awkward wording intentional). She truly is awesome. And pretty hilarious. And full of painful yet amusing experiences. I wish I had known about this book way long ago, because I absolutely love it. 

Throughout the novel, there are many times you’ll ask, “What the heck is wrong with her?!?!” and that’s the beauty of it, ladies and gentlemen. She truly knows how to make fun out of bad experiences.

Overall, this book really deserves five stars. It’s light-hearted, insightful, and absolutely hysterical. The stories she tells are mixed in with the small tragedies that she’s experienced, making it an all-out amazing read. If you’re looking for a book that is fun-to-read and hilarious, you should pick this one. *whisper* It’s awesome.

My rating: Five Freaking Beautiful Stars. Jenny Lawson, you deserve it. 

 

 

An Over-Due Book Review

“Like, oh, hey, great, here’s the rest of my life and it’s all still laid out in front of me.”

I’ve sincerely abandoned you nerds for a while, and I am so sorry. For a while I’ve been struggling with some things and so so busy and it’s been hard to keep up with this blog or even reading. I’m back now, though, and I hope I can pick it back up again. 

A book I recently read was What you Need by Andrew Forbes, which was an absolutely delighful book.

UGH this book took me way too long to read considering the lengt25250335.jpgh. It was definitely worth it, though.
“What You Need” is a collection of short stories involving a variety of characters in a variety of situations. In includes 16 beautifully-written shorts that are just… well, pretty great.

Overall, I think these stories are definitely stories that affect how you see people. Each short in this book have unique characters from different places and backgrounds. That’s what makes this so special. The personalities and backgrounds of the characters created by Forbes made me very intrigued and interested in the stories. It makes it an enjoyable read.

The author’s writing style is really nice, too. It helps convey what Forbes is trying to in these writings very effective. His writings are filled with a bit of tragedy, but mixed in there is a nice amount of humor. The style is interesting – a good interesting.

What I love, though, is how he makes humanity seem so mundane and yet extraordinary, in such a way that isn’t too sappy or over-romanticized/dramatized. With the characters, plots, and writing style, the stories are so entrancing that it’s actually not annoying. That’s a really nice thing if you don’t like books that are super dramatic or romanticized.

Do I recommend this book? Heck yeah. This book is just such a pleasant read. It presents humanity in such a compelling way and shows how people can come from such a vast variety of background. Yet it also shows how imperfect humans are, and how that can be such a beautiful thing. If you like that sort of thing (like me!) then you need to read this book.

My Rating: wpid-images.png

Winter of the World by Ken Follett: Review

Winter of the World is the second book in the Century Trilogy. This trilogy follows a series of generations in five different families struggling to survive through the 20th century. The second book, Winter of the World, picks up during World War II as the Third Reich rises and chaos ensues.

It begins with Walter and Maud Von Ulrich and their two children, Eric and Carla, in Berlin. Eric, who aspires to be a doctor, becomes a part of the Third Reich contrary to his parents’ wishes. Carla, on the other hand, works her hardest to become a nurse and assists in the war. On the other side of the world, American brothers Chuck and Woody Dewar both work their hardest to aid America in the war. Then we have Lloyd Williams, an Engl12959233.jpgishman who is determined to fight both Communism and Fascism to the best of his abilities. Winter of the World also follows Daisy, who cares only about her popularity, and her cousin Volodya, who is a crucial member of an intelligence team in Russia.

Yes, this novel is a total chaotic mess, but it has a great theme of strength and perseverance. It shows that in order to survive, we as humans use our strength and persevere through turmoil. Through the craziness of World War II, we see these characters fight through to reach their dreams and fight for what they believe is right. With that, it conveys its theme very strongly, and delivers a strong message about how with strength we can always survive.

Personally, I thoroughly enjoyed this novel. It was a bit long, but was worth the time. I always enjoy Follett’s work, and this one was equally enjoyable as all the rest. I especially loved how the characters were developed and how the plot was laid out. Unfortunately, it wasn’t as fast-paced as what I’m used to, but it was still quite enjoyable.

 

My rating: IMG_0176

Above by Isla Morley: A Review

UGH THERE IS SO MUCH TO SAY ABOUT THIS BOOK WITHOUT GIVING SPOILERS SO BARE WITH ME, K?

 

Okay, so this book was crazy. Really crazy. So, apparently a sixteen-year-old girl named Blythe Hallowell is kidnapped by a survivalist and is hidden in an abandoned missile silo. Seventeen years later, she escapes, and has to learn to survive Above.

 

ABOVE-provisional-cover

 

At first, I really enjoyed this book. It was action-packed and had a great writing style. The first part was just really great and I enjoyed it immensely.

Then she reaches Above and things went downhill from there.

Granted, I enjoyed this book, to a point. It was fun and interesting and it was very action-packed… In the beginning. As soon as Blythe reaches Above, it just wasn’t fun anymore. In fact, it was a total let-down.

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The idea of this book was there, but the execution fell flat. Personally, I feel like this book could have been cut in half. That so the first part wasn’t so underdeveloped and the reader had more time to get adjusted. I think that there was way too much that happened in this book.
Towards the end, it was hard for me to keep up with it because I had to remember minor details that was at the beginning of the book. In my opinion, this was because of the amount of events that occurred between the beginning and the end. There was just way too much.

Nerds, this book had so much potential! It’s so frustrating how this book is. I wanted to love this book so bad, but I just couldn’t.

My rating:

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I debated rating this a four, but there’s so much that kept me from doing so. This book was just such a let-down and I wanted this book to be so much better. Honestly, I wouldn’t recommend this book. If it had reached its full potential, then yes, I would. Still, this book still had more to work on.

 


 

 

Announcement: 

Okay, so before I go, I decided to let you nerds know that I’m changing the URL of the site on December 4th. I’ve found that the current URL is actually quite difficult for people (even me) to remember. I haven’t quite decided to what yet, I have a few contenders but I though maybe I could get a few suggestions from you lovely nerds. Thanks, guys!

 

Happy reading!! xoxo

 

 

Book Review: “Paper Towns”

Being a binge reader sucks. It’s like, going two months before finally picking up a book, finishing it, and then in the next three days you read like four books.

One of those books, happens to be Paper Towns. 

You guys know by now that I’m not one for following book trends, but this one seemed to be impossible to pass up. EVERYONE was reading it. So, I decided to give it a try.

51hgkNew+XL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Let me just put it plainly:

I loved this book. It was magical. There were so many things in this book that allowed me to look at life differently and made me realize so many things. I laughed, I got angry, and yes, nerds, I cried.

Paper Towns starts as Margo Roth Spiegelman climbs through her neighbor’s, Quentin’s, window and takes him on the night of his life. The next day, Margo goes missing. This sends Quentin on a quest, to find Margo, and to find himself.

I feel like this book says a lot of things. It says that people are ordinary. It says that people are complex. It says that we, as people, like to think of others as how we like to think of them, instead of how they really are. It says everything that a book, in my opinion, needs to say.

My Rating:

five-stars-rating

Seriously, nerds, read this book. It’s fantastic and needs to be read. When you finally put it down, it’ll leave you looking at the people around you differently. If you’ve already read this book, go ahead and comment what you thought about it. I’d love to hear it.

HAPPY READING!! XOXO

Gone Girl

Hey everyone! So, apparently school has taken over my life. Literally. Almost everyday I have an assignment to do that takes all day, or, if I don’t, I basically spend my evening doing nothing because sitting and doing nothing is rare in the life of  the nerdy book girl. So, it was amazing to actually get a full week off due to the weather, which means that I actually got a week to catch up on assignments, finish my history project, and finally return to reading books and writing book reviews.

Before I begin this review, I just want to say one thing: Gillian Flynn is a genius. The fact that someone could come up with a plot so intricate and full of crazy surprises actually thrills me. We need more authors like her.

This novel begins with Nick Dunne waking up on his fifth year anniversary. He’s dreading it, not just the day as a whole, but mostly one thing in particular: his wife’s annual treasure hunt. In these treasure hunts, she usually quizzes him on useless stuff about her that he has obviously failed to pay attention to throughout their relationship. So, typically, the day ends with both husband and wife getting frustrated. In order to avoid this catastrophe, he goes to the bar he owns, downs a few drinks, converses with his twin sister, then heads home. Where is his wife? Gone.

I’m going to have to stop there with the description because if I went any further, I’d have to spoil the book. Still, if you know how it ends, congratulations. I just hope you didn’t feel the pain that I did because I seriously did not expect the turn of events. (Yes, I do live under a rock, if that’s what you’re asking.) Despite the ending, however, and the enormous amount of pain that I had endured throughout the whole thing, I seriously loved this book. It was amazing, and if you’re a book nerd like me, those are hard to come by after you’ve read plenty of good books. Once your standards have been risen by other great books, it’s hard to find novels that actually fit the requirements of an actual good book. The awesome thing is: Gone Girl does that.

I can’t even find anything wrong with this book. That’s the problem I have. It was fast-paced, witty, and full of surprises. Do I recommend it? Absolutely.

If you have read this book, I’d love for you to comment below and tell me if you liked it. If you haven’t read it, DO. It definitely is NOT a waste of time.

 

Happy reading! 😉

How To Kill…

…a fictional character.

(Haha, got you, didn’t I?)

 

Don’t you hate when you read a wonderful novel by this magnificent author and this “magnificent” author kills that person (character) that you just love so much? Yeah, me too.

Well, today, I’m going to show you how it done, so that when you spot these signs of trouble in your book, you can avoid having your heart broken by a small stack of paper binded together. Yes, book nerds, I have found a cure to the illness of heart-breakage by books.

 

How to kill a fictional character:

1.) Create a gripping and fantastic storyline that hooks your reader.

2.) Then, introduce your main characters in a way that the reader cannot help but fall endlessly in love with them. ♥

3.) Now you need a conflict. This conflict needs to be super intense, so that the reader can now be truly engrossed into the story. This is the bait.

4.) In step four, the conflict needs to become even more intense, by adding small little bits of obstacles in the paths of your characters.

5.) Gather all of your characters and make sure that before you “off” this particular character, a love story ensues. That just makes everything better.

6.) Finally, the time has come to kill your character. Carefully choose the timing of the death. If it’s too soon, it fails. If it’s too late, it fails. Make sure you perfectly time this death, so that you can truly hurt that reader in the feels. Now… KILL.

 

 

In The Land Of Blue Burqas

After turning the last page, I can’t even tell you about the smile that this book had placed on my face.

Kate McCord has spent five years in Afghanistan, working with an NGO (non-government organization). During these five years she conversed with the Afghan people, laughed with the Afghan people, helped them, and learned to love them. In this book,  she shares the stories she’s heard with us, in her attempt to show us the way Afghans live and how we can impact their lives.

As I read this book, I learned so much about Middle Eastern Culture and how their religion impacts their culture. I also learned how much Jesus impacted the world He lived in.

I was so inspired as I read this book. I cannot truly tell you how much it affected my spirituality and helped me become a better Christian. I couldn’t have began the year with a better book.

The only problem I had with this book was that it was repetitive. It repeated several facts and stories throughout the novel. However, it barely affected my overall feeling about this book.

This book was truly amazing and is definitely educational. Therefore, I recommend this book to everyone.

If you’ve already read this book, leave a comment below because I would love to know what you think.

Happy reading!

I Am The Messenger: Book Review

So, finally, after all this holiday craziness, I finally got to sit down and read. I couldn’t have picked a better book to end the year with.

 

In “I Am The Messenger” by Markus Zusak, Ed Kennedy is an underage taxi driver who honestly has no plans for his life. And he’s okay with that. Yet, when he prevents a bank robbery right in his hometown, things change. Soon, Ed Kennedy begins to get these “messages” which are more like riddles on the Aces of ordinary playing cards. Throughout this book, Ed goes through an Ace of each of the four suits in a card deck, and as he does so, he learns an important lesson: even the smallest thing can impact a person’s life.

 

I officially have a new favorite book, and here’s several reasons why:

 

1) Markus Zusak teaches us one of the most important life lessons and the most subtle way possible.

2) The language of this book and the way it was written is just fantastic.

3) From the first page, you’re literally swept away by the beauty of the writing and the really strange but awesome plot.

4) This book is basically some kind of therapeutic experience mixed in with this crazy emotional roller coaster that totally can remind you of the mood swings of a teenage girl.emotions-46863

5) The plot kind of reminds you of Charlie’s Angels, but with a guy and it’s less… you know… provocative.

 

But, to be honest, nerds, if you want to really know the reason why I love this book so much, pick it up and read it. It’s worth it.

 

I hope you guys enjoyed this review! Any book suggestions, go ahead and comment. Have a great New Year’s nerds!

 

Oh… and happy reading! 😉